GRAMMAR


Concepts We Covered Semester 1:


Identifying Words as Parts of Speech

Subject
Predicate
Direct and Indirect Object
Independent and Dependent Clauses

Parallel Structure
Active/Passive Voice
Comma Splices
Dashes
Semicolons
Colons

Assignment #1: Grammar People


Create either "Parts of Speech People" (8) or "Subject, Predicate, Direct Object, and Indirect Object, Independent, and Subordinate Clause People." You can do this on video or through Comic Life or with some other program I haven't mentioned. The only requirement: Each person much have at least twenty words of dialogue that help the audience understand the concept behind the character.

This project should be shared with me via email, and posted in what we'll call your iWeb notebook (which will eventually be published on the 'Net).

Inspiration for your "Parts of Speech People," as well as "Subject, Predicate, Direct Object, and Indirect Object, Independent, and Subordinate Clause People."
Mr. T



Assignment #2: Soap Opera





Assignment #3: Grammar Test


Create a test over the following (with answer key) and send it to me by email:

Subject
Predicate
Direct and Indirect Object
Independent and Dependent Clauses
Parallel Structure
Active/Passive Voice
Comma Splices
Dashes
Semicolons
Colons


Assignment #4: Super Hero


Please create a story that's 300 words or more with a superhero in it. You must use and label (no surprise here) each of the following:

Subject
Predicate
Direct and Indirect Object
Independent and Dependent Clause
Parallel Structure
Active Voice
Passive Voice
Dash(es)
Semicolon
Colons


Assignment #5: Updated iWeb Notebook


Your iWeb notebook should have DEFINITIONS and EXAMPLES of all of the following:

Subject
Predicate
Direct and Indirect Object
Independent and Dependent Clauses
Parallel Structure
Active/Passive Voice
Comma Splices
Dashes
Semicolons
Colons

If you know the concept well, please indicate that by your definition and example.

If you do not know the concept well, please supply at least one NON-EXAMPLE before or after your example, and explain why it is not a good example.

If you did not score a MEETS on the parts of speech ID quiz, you need a page where you identify three different example words for each part of speech. You should identify these words IN SENTENCES.

Please compress a copy of your iWeb notebook and send it to me as an attachment!


Updated iWeb Notebook Rubric:


EXCEEDS
Thorough, thoughtful, creative.

MEETS
Thorough and thoughtful, with a few minor inaccuracies or omissions.

PARTIALLY MEETS
Notes are somewhat incomplete, or not particularly thoughtful.



What's On for Semester 2:




Deadline: May 19

Future assignment:



Deadline: May 31


Final Exam:

A good example of the final exam:




Just for Fun (not an official assignment): Mad Libs== ==

DEBATE


Event Choices:



LINCOLN DOUGLASS
This is the simplest mode of debate - it's certainly a good way of being introduced to debate, if you've never done it.

Warning: The real debate starts about 8:30 into this video. The volume is low, but if you use earphone or plug in speakers, you should clearly hear what's said.
Resolved: that the pursuit of scientific knowledge ought to be restrained by concern for the social good.


PUBLIC FORUM
This seems like a pretty dynamic and somewhat complex mode of debate. It's in teams.




Resolved: that when a choice is required for public high schools in the United States, government funding should prioritize vocational education over college preparatory education.


CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE
What is Student Congress? (This explanation is taken from Maine Forensic Association materials.)
Student Congress is basically a derivative from our own Legislature government. Students form a legislative body (House of Representatives and Senate), which in turn debate and pass laws as if they were real legislature. The students are to be called either Representatives or Senators while attending a meet. The event should always be treated as if they were actually sitting in the United States Congress. By participating in this a student can learn all about how a bill becomes a law. They also learn about government, the constitution, and what it is like to be in a government position. Students are the most important element of Student Congress. They write the bills that are considered in session and determine the course of the proceedings through a variety of motions and the decisions of their presiding officer. A minimum number of students and schools (4) are needed in order for the Congress to be sanctioned by the NFL. Each school can send up to two in the Senate(those should be your top debaters from your school) and as many as you would like to the House. One judge or Parliamentarian per 5 students is required.

The first seven minutes is explanation of congressional debate and how it works; examples of congressional debate follow.


SPEECH

Lincoln Douglass Debate:
2010 September/October Topic
Resolved: States ought not possess nuclear weapons.

Public Forum Debate:
2010 October Topic
Resolved: NATO presence improves the lives of Afghan citizens.

Speech:

Prose and Novice Prose Reading
Poetry Reading and Novice Poetry Reading (PO and NPO)
Humorous Interpretation (HI)
Dramatic Interpretation (DI)
Duo Interpretation (Duo)
Ensemble (ENS)
Storytelling (ST)
Oratorical Declamation (ODec)
Original Works (OW)
Original Oratory (OO)
Extemporaneous (XT)

Example of an extemporaneous speech:


Extemporaneous topics:
Domestic:
September, October, and November:
Politics in America: Elections
Islam in America
The American Educational System
Foreign:
September, October, and November:
Islam as an influence in the world today
China & India and Brazil and Russia
Middle East

Please explore the debate format of your choice at this site:
Maine Forensic Association Event Resources

Another site to be explored eventually:
National Forensic League

Meetings and Meets:


Tuesday Team Meetings:

Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26

Possible first meet at Maranacook? Observation meet?: Oct. 23

"Definite" first meet at Bangor: Oct. 30



Debate we're probably not going to do:
Policy Debate (not much done anymore in Maine):
Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce its military and/or police presence in one or more of the following: South Korea, Japan, Afghanistan, Kuwait, Iraq, Turkey




BRITISH LIT



Q1:


I am the Messenger by Markus Zusack




STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.



College Essay


Write one! Give me the prompt for it, too, if you could.

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre

STANDARD: Write pieces related to educational development, career issues, and civic participation


Mini Speech


Give a mini speech of no longer than a minute. Identify your use of appeals to logic, emotion, and character.

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre

STANDARD: Apply rhetorical skills and demonstrate the use of structures and conventions (MUGS)




"This I Believe" essay


Write an essay that's like a "This I Believe" essay. You can find examples of "This I Believe" essays here. This essay will be assessed using the Expressive Writing Rubric. Be sure to use language that appeals to the senses!

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre

STANDARD: Apply rhetorical skills and demonstrate the use of structures and conventions (MUGS)



"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot



STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre



A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce




STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre



"A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift


"A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift

1) A zipped Pages worksheet in which you must identify rhetorical devices in "A Modest Proposal":


STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.

2) Create your own "Modest Proposal," which should be at least 500 words long, and which will be scored using the expressive writing rubric.

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre

STANDARD: Apply rhetorical skills and demonstrate the use of structures and conventions (MUGS)



"The Importance of Being Earnest" by Oscar Wilde


"The Importance of Being Earnest" writing prompt:


STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre.

STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.


Romantic Poetry


"The World is Too Much with Us" by William Wordsworth
"Kubla Khan" by Samuel Coleridge
"Bright Star" by John Keats



San Jose University - Romanticism

STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.


The Byronic Hero


Definitions:
University of Houston - Byronic Hero
Fullerton College Course on the Byronic Hero
Dr. Wheeler's Definition of a Byronic Hero (Carson-Newman College) (See bottom of page.)
Georgetown College - Eng 213

Assignment:
Write a minimum of 250 words on a moment or a day in the life of a modern Byronic hero. Your dramatization should feature no fewer than three qualities of a Byronic hero. Three evident Byronic hero qualities will earn an "exceeds"; two, a "meets"; and one a "partially meets."

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre



Frankenstein


A 1910 silent film on the Frankenstein story produced by Thomas Edison:




Some Frankenstein retellings:

"Real" Frankenstein


WSNBL


Franken----


STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre.

STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.




Hamlet






Your final assignment:




B B's Xtranormal

A W's Xtranormal

STANDARD: Use a writing process to develop an appropriate genre

STANDARD: Read and evaluate texts, within a grade appropriate span of text complexity, by applying knowledge and strategies of comprehension and vocabulary.



Final


Write a story involving five fictional characters we've studied this year in British Literature.







Brit Lit Literary Timeline: Part I



Timeline #1
Timeline #2



AP Language



Please use the sign in link, then choose the discussion link.
Google Sign In
Honors/AP Discussion Group



Q1

Logos, Ethos, and Pathos in Rhetoric

Find examples of logos, ethos, and pathos in this video:


How should people be governed?


The Reality Behind The Grapes of Wrath:
Todd/Sonkin Collecting Expedition


(Becker interview: mention of Grapes of Wrath; description of camps)
(Higginbotham interview I: Getting forced off land)
(Government Camp Song)
(Interview with Jose Flores)
(Interview with Jose Flores - American Citizenship and American Families)
(Oklahoma)
(Fight for Union Recognition)
(Sunny Cal)


The Crucible and McCarthyism:
Edward Murrow and McCarthyism
NPR: Walter Cronkite's Take on Murrow/McCarthy Exchange 50 Years Later
Murrow's Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy (text)
The End of Murrow's Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy (audio)
McCarthy Reply to Edward Murrow (text)
McCarthy's Reply to Edward Murrow (CBS video)

Check out this video on McCarthyism:


A somewhat less engaging but historically accurate video on McCarthyism:






SUCCESS AND OPPORTUNITY IN AMERICA

How should success in one's life be measured?

How well has the United States lived up to its image as the "land of opportunity"?

How well does it do that now?







Their Eyes Were Watching God:

Zora Neale Hurston's Hometown Legacy Video

Alachua County's "Big Read" of Their Eyes Were Watching God:
(This video contains some information about the movement in the 1970's to bring more attention to Hurston's life and writing.)


Zora Neale Hurston Festival 2009:
(There's not much substance to this video, but it does reflect Hurston's popularity today.)




The Great Gatsby:

McCord Museum - 1920's Game

Library of Congress: The American Dream

Brookings Institution: "Five Myths about our Land of Opportunity"





Other Gatsby activities/resources:
Gatsby Treasure Hunt by Valerie Arbizu
Wordles for Each Chapter of The Great Gatsby
Daisy Lullaby


Q2


EDUCATION







Questions we discussed that could be helpful with paper on how education at MBHS should be improved:

  • Should school start later?
  • How can teachers engage students more?
  • Should we have nap time?
  • How should MBHS ask students to use technology?
  • Is it an educator's job to make sure a student succeeds?
  • [My rewording of the previous question.] How can we provide students with more independence to help them succeed?
  • Should students be required to take a broad range of subjects?
  • Should classes be shorter?
  • How much homework should students get?




Q3


Achieve Your Dreams - Don't be an Ethan Frome














Syntax links:

"I Heard a Fly Buzz"

The Crossing (Go to page 126. Start with "By the time he reached . . ."; read until the end of the chapter.)



Research




Deadlines:
Notes over six resources - Tuesday, March 8
Rough draft with "Works Cited" and in-text citations - Tuesday, March 22
Final draft - Wednesday, March 30











* * * Everything below this line is under construction. * * *


How appropriate is Huckleberry Finn for public school?


Some critics have accused Mark Twain of finding degrading stereotypes that were popular in his day humorous and possibly even realistic. Explore the following links, think about how Jim's character is treated in Huckleberry Finn, and decide for yourself how appropriate Huckleberry Finn is for public school.
Blackface Minstrelsey
American Minstrel Show Collection
Minstrel Show - Wikipedia Entry
Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia
The Black and White Minstrel Show on Video
Time Shift: The Black and White Show Revisited

Western Michigan University Resources on Huckleberry Finn controversy




SAT Prep






Pop Culture Research Paper






Grammar Review


Parallel Structure Quiz



Interactive Grammar Quizzes


AP Language Exam Prep


Here is a link to all past AP writing prompts. Please avoid the 2007 and 2007B prompts if you are going to take the full-length practice AP exam.
Past AP Writing Prompts



General advice:
1) Prewrite: list, idea web. Do whatever works best for you.
2) Use language with which you're comfortable. Solid thinking that's clearly (and maybe even energetically) expressed is your goal.

Synthesis Essay advice:
1) Read the question carefully. The prompt may ask you to do something different than just take a side.
2) Your opinion is central. Resources provide context and input, and are somewhat peripheral.
2) Use more than one source to make a point, when possible.
3) Be critical of resources. Be mindful of where information is actually coming from, and don't be afraid to comment on the bias or validity of what a source is saying.
4) Compare/contrast sources if that's helpful when assessing or criticizing a source.

Analytic Essay advice:
1) In your intro, identify the author's argument.
2) Always examine rhetorical strategies to explain how they help achieve a purpose. There is no other reason to mention rhetorical strategies.


Q4




Alternative Assignment for Missed Timed Writings Not Made Up by the AP Exam







A Midsummer Night's Dream


BBC animated version, part I/ BBC animated version, part II





BBC animated version, part III


A Midsummer Night's Dream Scene Recreation Assignment:






Start College Essay


Common Application Online



Poetry, Short Stories, A Novel, and a Play

Emily Dickinson
Emily's Garden
A Rare Photo of Emily
"Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church"
"'Hope' Is the Thing with Feathers"
"The Soul Selects Her Own Society"

Walt Whitman
Barbaric Yawp - Dead Poets Society
"A Supermarket in California"
Howl
Ginsberg Video and Audio
The Connection Between Ginsberg and Whitman
Song of Myself
"When I Heard the Learned Astronomer"
"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry"
"Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking"
"When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed"



Ernest Hemingway

Picturing Hemingway



Hemingway quotes




Final Exam:



(Common Application)








Jr Honors Eng


What's On Right Now:


Emily Dickinson
Emily's Garden
A Rare Photo of Emily

Walt Whitman
Barbaric Yawp - Dead Poets Society
"A Supermarket in California"
Howl
Ginsberg Video and Audio
The Connection Between Ginsberg and Whitman
Song of Myself
"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry"
"Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking"
"When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed"

Ernest Hemingway



Picturing Hemingway






Final Exam:




Plan from Now to School Year's End:
  • Tiny analysis of Huck Finn excerpt
  • Rough draft college essay
  • Response Poems to Walt and Emily
  • A Hemingwayesque Short Story
  • F451 with a creative response?
  • Lit vocab?
  • Final: A Business Proposal You Can't Refuse

Quick Menu

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4


Please use the sign in link, then choose the discussion link.
Google Sign In
Honors/AP Discussion Group


General Rubrics and Checklists:


external image pdf.png Academic Initiative Scoring Guide .pdf








Vocabulary:





mla_example-1.jpg

Q1


Philosophy of Life








Winning an Argument








Debate:

International Debate Education Association








Radio editorial:

Opinion on National Public Radio

Youth Radio on National Public Radio (This contains both news stories and editorials.)

Youth Radio (This site is pretty dynamic, but isn't well organized.)


Please see the Expressive Writing Rubric and Expressive Writing Checklist for this assignment.

National Public Radio - "This I Believe"


Common Assessment: Analyzing Rhetoric





The common assessment:


Things you'll need to do the common assessment:

National Public Radio - "This I Believe"






Dreams and Aspirations : The Great Gatsby


McCord Museum - 1920's Game








Other Gatsby activities/resources:

Gatsby Treasure Hunt by Valerie Arbizu
Wordles for Each Chapter of The Great Gatsby
Daisy Lullaby



Q2


Pursuing Personal Fulfillment: Their Eyes Were Watching God






Q3


Achieve Your Dreams - Don't be an Ethan Frome










Literary and Poetic Devices








Research



Deadlines:
Notes over six resources - Thursday, March 10
Rough draft with "Works Cited" and in-text citations - Tuesday, March 22
Final draft - Wednesday, March 30





EVERYTHING BELOW IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Defining Success: the Enlightenment and Transcendentalism


Readings on the Enlightenment (or Age of Reason), Jefferson, and Franklin:
UShistory.org: The Impact of Enlightenment in Europe
Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia: The Enlightenment
Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia: Thomas Jefferson
Reason and Power in Benjamin Franklin's Political Thought
Learning to Give Biography of Benjamin Franklin



Benjamin Franklin's Virtues (p. 69):


Possible reading:
Dialogue Between Franklin and the Gout

Web Quest Resources for Transcendentalism:
Puritanism in New England
"I Hear America Singing" - PBS
American Transcendentalism Web: Definitions of Transcendentalism
American Transcendentalism Web: Emerson
American Transcendentalism: Thoreau
American Transcendentalism Web: Social and Political Changes in the Time of Emerson and Thoreau
UShistory.org: Transcendentalism
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy definition of Transcendentalism
Encyclopedia Brittanica: Transcendentalism
Funk and Wagnall's New World Encyclopedia: Transcendentalism



Readings on Transcendentalism:
_Essays_ by Ralph Waldo Emerson (an e-book)
_Walden_ and "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" by Henry David Thoreau (an e-book)


Please see the Persuasive Writing Rubric and Persuasive Writing Checklist for this assignment.




Exploring Poetry: Walt and Emily


Assignments/activities to be posted.




Exploring Love: A Midsummer Night's Dream


Assignments/activities to be posted.


Researching our Changing World


Library Link


external image pdf.png Changing World Research Paper CP.pdf



SAT Prep





The Crucible

Apparently, this site only works on Safari, not Firefox.
salem_witch_trials.jpg

Check out this video on McCarthyism:


A somewhat less engaging but historically accurate video on McCarthyism:



Assignments/activities to be posted.



Q4



Satirizing Successfully: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn


Daryl Cagle's Political Cartoons




Satire assignment: Write a satire of at least 300 words. It will be graded using the rubric below:




Examples of student satires:



Selling Yourself as a Student: the College Essay


Common Application Online

(Common Application)



Bringing Your Past to Life: The Things They Carried


The Things They Carried assignment: Write an autobiographical piece about your childhood at least 300 words long. You should be willing to share this piece with other students.
Please see the Expressive Writing Rubric and Expressive Writing Checklist for this assignment.





Jr Eng CP (only 4B) - CPI


What's On Right Now:

Emily Dickinson
Emily's Garden
A Rare Photo of Emily
"Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church"
"'Hope' Is the Thing with Feathers"
"The Soul Selects Her Own Society"
Walt Whitman
Barbaric Yawp - Dead Poets Society
"A Supermarket in California"
Howl
Ginsberg Video and Audio
The Connection Between Ginsberg and Whitman
Song of Myself




Final Exam:




Some examples of reflections on writing:






General Rubrics and Checklists:


external image pdf.png Academic Initiative Scoring Guide Academic Initiative Scoring Guide .pdf








Q3:

Learning from Other People's Dreams






4B American Dream writing prompt: What can you learn from other people's dreams?


Paragraph #1: What my dream(s) are. Thesis: There are some valuable lesson to be learned from The Great Gatsby/ the experience of other Americans.
Paragraph #2: One lesson to be learned. Explain the lesson from Gatsby or an American, then explain how it applies to your own life.
Paragraph #3: Another lesson to be learned. Explain the lesson from Gatsby or an American, then explain how it applies to your own life.
Paragraph #4: Conclusion.









mla_example-1.jpg

Q1


Growing Up


Personality Traits and Values Checklists from California State University at Northridge

from Azusa Pacific University

The Psychology of Color

The Mandala Project



New York Times: "What Is It About 20-Somethings?"
VOCAB


Please see the Expressive Writing Rubric and Expressive Writing Checklist for this assignment.

"Growing Up" Vocabulary

("Precocious Puberty")
("Boys Mature")
("Teen Angst")


Winning an Argument





Common Assessment: Analyzing Rhetoric








Things you'll need to do the common assessment:

National Public Radio - "This I Believe"











Everything Under This Line is Under Construction


Quick Menu:
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4

General Resources/Rubrics:


external image pdf.png Academic Initiative Scoring Guide .pdf

Example of an MLA-formatted paper:


Q1


Q2


Q3


Q4


The Crucible

A video about McCarthyism:




Satire


Daryl Cagle's Political Cartoons

The Things I Carry






College/Military Essay


Final Reflection and Presentation







Multiple Intelligences Quiz

Anticipation Guide







The American Dream: Definitions



The American Dream according to AP Language 2G:

It changes for each individual.
Big house, big car, lots of money.
2.5 kids & a white picket fence.
Being free.
Summer house or camp.
Not being obese.
Being famous.
Liking one's job; working one's dream job.
Not being impoverished.
Doing the least amount of work for the most amount of gain.
Six figure income.
Finding "the one."


The American Dream according to AP Language 4B and other sources:

Goin somewhere wit nuttin' in your pocket.
Nuttin now... but goin' somewhere.
"...liberty and justice for all"
BASEBALL (see related article below)
The American Dream originated from James Adams in 1931: Every citizen should have "a better, richer, and happier life."
The widespread aspiration of Americans to live better than their parents did.
Economic independence and the opportunity for social advancement through financial gain.
"...success, fame, and wealth through thrift and hard work"


The American Dream according to a variety of sources:

From Library of Congress. American Memory. "What is the American Dream?". Accessed August 21, 2008 on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Dream:

“ The American Dream is that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for every man, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.[8] ”

This same author also wrote:

“ The American Dream, that has lured tens of millions of all nations to our shores in the past century has not been a dream of material plenty, though that has doubtlessly counted heavily. It has been a dream of being able to grow to fullest development as a man and woman, unhampered by the barriers which had slowly been erected in the older civilizations, unrepressed by social orders which had developed for the benefit of classes rather than for the simple human being of any and every class.

This mentions that while, life should be better for each person, the dream is a big part of social class.... or in this case, it would be better of there was a lack of.
The thing is though (i'm not sure if i'm allowed to put this in) when have we ever had that sort of sutuation? When have we NEVER had social stature? does this mean there can't be a dream? (because do you think that we have a chance of getting rid of social standings?)
Or, think about this.... are people really allowed to move up in the chain?

*

"Whereas the American Dream was once equated with certain principles of freedom, it is now equated with things. The American Dream has undergone a metamorphosis from principles to materialism. ... When people are concerned more with the attainment of things than with the maintenance of principles, it is a sign of moral decay. And it is through such decay that loss of freedom occurs."
--John E. Nestler, http://www.todaysamericandream.com/ (i know...)

(Response to the idea of material gains being a large part of The American Dream)
"...this was not the dream envisioned by the Founding Fathers. Remember that, for the most part, America's founders gave up their material wealth and substance for something they considered of far greater worth. Unfortunately, this hedonistic generation knows little of the kind of sacrificial spirit personified in the lives of America's patriarchs."
--Chuck Baldwin (from the same source)

*

http://www.ecweekend.com/features/story.asp?id=49872
This is an interview of Jason Macheska who attempted to catch a break in the music business at a very young age and starved for the attention that he thought the American Dream would provide. However, this was not sufficient and he now lives with his girlfriend and is very successful with his dental career. He hopes to have children and spend time with his family more often; this is his current view on what the American Dream means to him. Nothing matters more to him today than having a successful home life whereas at a young age he wanted to run away and see how far he could get with his music career.

***

http://www.americansc.org.uk/Online/American_Dream.htm
The traditional American dream was “rags to riches” meaning that any person could succeed in life and become wealthy if they worked hard. However, since the rise of the industry, people have come to think of the Dream as something that happens because of luck, not because of hard work. “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire” and lotteries are perfect examples of today’s quest for the American Dream. Lawsuits are another example of today’s American Dream. Warshauer says that these relate to the American Dream because maybe someone can be “lucky enough to be injured by someone whose product or conduct can be proved faulty.” Lawsuits may seem unrelated to the Dream, but Warshauer points out that just like lotteries, lawsuits can end in a “trip to the bank with a fat check.” A key part of the original American Dream that these current paths to wealth are missing is hard work. Instead, Americans are relying on luck. Sometimes, lawsuits that end in millions of dollars can be ridiculous- a woman recieved millions after suing McDonalds because she spilled her hot coffee on herself and got a burn. Warshauer concludes by saying that maybe the sense of entitlement of reaching the Dream has actually turned into a lack of responsibility. He says that many Americans are taking the easy road and by doing this, undercutting “the core values that established the Dream in the first place.”


Random Information Relating to the Current Status of the American Dream:


"Real median earnings of both men
and women who worked full-time,
year-round declined in 2008, fol-
lowing increases in 2007. Men’s
earnings declined by 1.0 percent
to $46,367 and women’s declined
by 1.9 percent to $35,745."
- the US Census Bureau

http://www.google.com/publicdata?ds=usunemployment&met=unemployment_rate&tdim=true&q=Unemployment+Rate
The American unemployment rate has peaked in the last year at about 9.7%

http://www.google.com/publicdata?ds=uspopulation&met=population&tdim=true&q=Population+trends
The American Population has reached over 304 million

Regions
  • Between 2007 and 2008, real median household income declined in the South by 4.9 percent (to $45,590), declined in the Midwest by 4.0 percent (to $50,112) and declined in the West by 2.0 percent (to $55,085). Income in the Northeast was statistically unchanged ($54,346). The apparent differences in the declines in median household income between the South and Midwest, and the Midwest and West were not statistically significant. The apparent difference between the median household incomes for the West and Northeast was not statistically significant.
This is showing how the income has been changing over time in different regions

http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/SavingandDebt/P70581.asp

  • About 43% of American families spend more than they earn each year.

  • Average households carry some $8,000 in credit card debt.

  • Personal bankruptcies have doubled in the past decade.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/001863.html
  • 85% of people over 25 have now graduated from High School, a new all-time high according to the Census Bureau
  • 46% of people in Washington D.C. have a college degree, which is higher than any other state
  • Hispanics with a high school degree has risen from 53% to 57%
  • In 2002, average earnings by highest level of education were: for those with advanced degrees, $72,824; for bachelor’s degree-holders, $51,194; for high school graduates, $27,280; and for non-graduates, $18,826.

A study from Columbia University has shown that sending black and Latino students across school district boundary lines into predominately white suburban schools has helped to close the achievement gaps between black and white and Latino and white students.
http://www.tc.columbia.edu/news/article.htm?id=7233

This is a link to a page that gives the statistics for impoverished people. Some of the statistics that jumped out at me was the one inwhich the U.S. was ranked in poverty of the 25 most developed nations[[http://Statistics for Poverty|http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2007/04/poverty_numbers.html]]

http://chrisgardnermedia.com/about/bio
Christopher Gardner was the inspiration for the film “The pursuit of Happyness”. During his childhood he encountered poverty, domestic violence, alcohol abuse, sexual abuse, and family illiteracy.
Christopher Gardner, without a college degree, would later become a stock broker for Bear Stearns & Co, and eventually started his own brokerage firm.

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2009/04/american-dream200904

http://www.changetowin.org/connect/2008/08/dnc_2008_the_state_of_the_amer.html
Many Americans today feel that the American Dream is becoming less and less obtainable. They are ready for changes both in the economy and in leadership and understand they have to power to make that change. A poll showed many working Americans have responded positively to Barack Obama and his promises of change...

check-out-of-american-dream1.jpg
http://keokierra.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/check-out-of-american-dream1.jpg

Ahem Ahem, I would like to tell you that there is a play titled American Dream it is written by Edward Albee. That is all. Except I suppose maybe I should say something about how our american dream is so important that we need to make a play about it. right????? ok, that's it. the end.

http://www.sparknotes.com/drama/americandream/context.html
(god bless sparknotes)

-The American dream of owning a home and having a business or a job that can offer financial stability and independence is part of our heritage
-drive to improve the quality of life
-http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Pursuit-of-Happiness-and-the-American-Dream-Its-All-About-Improving-the-Quality-of-Life&id=2987853

-The American dream refers to the belief in a better life
- american-dream1.jpg

Is the American Dream Killing You?

Some can define the American Dream by the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. What do they represent? “Liberty and justice for all.”
The concept that the ultimate power goes to ‘the people’ of a nation is the main concept of American Government and lifestyle.
But do these documents mention the amount of power that “the market” has on its citizens? In a book called Is the American Dream Killing You?, by Paul Stiles, the idea that the ‘American Dream’s’ concept of ‘power to the people’ is no longer... true. The huge “nebulous power” of ‘the market’ controls our lives. Here is a wuote from the introduction of Stiles’ book:

“The free market has been the undeniable source of tremendous material prosperity. It has driven historic advances in technology, conferred unprecedented material advantages upon the public, and made America the world’s economic superpower. These are no small achievements. So I suppose it is natural that we would come to the conclusion that the free market is an unlimited good, and always will be, even as it wraps its fingers around our throat.”










-http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http:keokierra.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/check-out-of-american-dream1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://keokierra.wordpress.com/2008/10/24/reaching-the-american-dream/&h=425&w=580&sz=122&tbnid=d9Dwb2lp8YYeUM:&tbnh=98&tbnw=134&prev=/images%3Fq%3Damerican%2Bdream&usg=__b1XxAN058T7jegTfX3fsvNNJuEc=&ei=aicMS_vxENCplAf6htidBA&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=4&ct=image&ved=0CB0Q9QEwAw

"…held certain truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness." <<<The American Dream

Many seem to consider the American Dream as dying. Yet it is rather changing. What used to be a dream to walk on streets of gold then became living the content family life in a picture perfect suburban home and continues to progress. The constant behind the dream is the drive to be content and successful working people.

"In the deepening gloom of the Depression, the American Dream represented a reaffirmation of traditional American hopes"' (Anthony Brandt).




Rhetoric


Rhetorical devices and text structures help an author persuade.
Here's a handout that lists several devices and text structures:

Can you identify any of the rhetorical devices or text structures the Penguin uses in the following video?


Can you identify any of the rhetorical devices or text structures used by Gov. Ed Rendel or the National Rifle Association's Wayne LaPierre in the following video?


Can you identify any of the rhetorical devices or text structures Sarah Palin uses to convince you that she should be the next Vice President of the United States?//





Reading Room


Bookseer.jpg
The Bookseer

bulldog.jpg
The Daily Bulldog

espn.jpg
Poets.jpg
Gutenberg.jpg
SI.jpg
NYT.jpg





Journalism


Midterm:

* create mini feature and hard news articles with appropriate leads and well-embedded quotes

* identify nut graphs

* AP Style


News of the Day:

Colbert Report

Maine Governor Gets Testy with NAACP

Find the Nut Graphs:

A Learning Model

Study Finds Limited Learning in College

American Assassins

Last Year the Warmest on Record (Again)





Rubrics:













File Translator:

Zamzar



AP Style Guide:




Youth Radio Podcast


Radio News and Commentary:


News
* The Short-Lived Fame of Pint-Sized Rap Stars

* Trafficked Teen Girls Describe Life in 'The Game'

* Arresting Youth in Sex Trafficking Raises Debate

Commentary
* Changing Roles in Marriage

* The Scary Side of Online Dating

* Talking to Teens about Sex



Youth Radio

Youth Radio at NPR

hsj.org (High School Journalism .org)

The High School Broadcast Journalism Project

CBS: Everybody Has a Story
Everybody Has a Story: Adoption
Everybody Has a Story: Soul Food






EYP 2011


Jr English EYP assignments:




Quack



Plot Outline for Homer's Odyssey



Growing Up Essay




The following rubric and checklist should be used for the Growing Up essay.






Learning from Other People's Dreams


Please complete the worksheet below, then write the essay by using the prompt and suggested structure in blue.



American Dream writing prompt: What can you learn from other people's pursuit of ambitions and dreams?


Paragraph #1: What my dream(s) are, and a quick summary of things that will make achieving them difficult.
Thesis: I stand a better chance of achieving my dreams by paying attention to the experience of other Americans.


Paragraph #2: One lesson to be learned. Explain the lesson from an American, then explain how it applies to your own life.


Paragraph #3: Another lesson to be learned. Explain the lesson from an American, then explain how it applies to your own life.


Paragraph #4: Conclusion.




Parody/Satire


Please write a satire or a parody of at least 100 words. In a paragraph (at least three sentences), please explain if your piece is a parody or a satire or both, and then explain how the parody or satire works.




Report on a Profession






Changing World Research Paper







Podcast Editorial


Examples:
Opinion on National Public Radio
Youth Radio on National Public Radio (This contains both news stories and editorials.)
Youth Radio (This site is pretty dynamic, but isn't well organized.)










3B & 2G: Gatsby and the American Dream






Q3


Report on a Profession





Researching our Changing World






"Changing World" Research Deadlines and Grade Weights:
Missing either of the first two deadlines means you will not get help from me via email, but may get help from me before or after school.

2G:
Exploratory Research (Research x3): Tuesday. Feb. 15
Rough Draft, not including MLA, but with Cornell Notes for all resources (Research x3): Tuesday, March 8
Final Draft (Research x 10; MUGS x 5): Tuesday, March 22
Presentation (Listening/Speaking x3): Monday, March 28

3B:
Exploratory Research (Research x3): Wednesday. Feb. 16
Rough Draft, not including MLA, but with Cornell Notes for all resources (Research x3): Monday, March 7
Final Draft (Research x 10; MUGS x 5): Wednesday, March 23
Presentation (Listening/Speaking x3): Tuesday, March 29













Create Your Own SAT















Everything Below is Under Construction


Defining Success: the Enlightenment and Transcendentalism


Readings on the Enlightenment (or Age of Reason), Jefferson, and Franklin:
Core Ideals of the Enlightenment
UShistory.org: The Impact of Enlightenment in Europe
Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia: The Enlightenment
Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia: Thomas Jefferson
Reason and Power in Benjamin Franklin's Political Thought
Learning to Give Biography of Benjamin Franklin



Benjamin Franklin's Virtues (p. 69):


Possible readings:
Dialogue Between Franklin and the Gout
The Declaration of Independence

Web Quest Resources for Transcendentalism:
Puritanism in New England
"I Hear America Singing" - PBS
American Transcendentalism Web: Definitions of Transcendentalism
American Transcendentalism Web: Emerson
American Transcendentalism: Thoreau
American Transcendentalism Web: Social and Political Changes in the Time of Emerson and Thoreau
UShistory.org: Transcendentalism
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy definition of Transcendentalism
Encyclopedia Brittanica: Transcendentalism
Funk and Wagnall's New World Encyclopedia: Transcendentalism



Readings on Transcendentalism:
_Essays_ by Ralph Waldo Emerson (an e-book)
_Walden_ and "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" by Henry David Thoreau (an e-book)


Please see the Persuasive Writing Rubric and Persuasive Writing Checklist for this assignment.

Anti-Transcendentalism: Nathaniel Hawthorne/"Young Goodman Brown" - to be posted.

Defining Success, Part II: The Great Gatsby


Brookings Institution: "Five Myths about our Land of Opportunity"

McCord Museum - 1920's Game
Gatsby Treasure Hunt by Valerie Arbizu

Wordles for Each Chapter of The Great Gatsby
Daisy Lullaby

Feature article prompt: Interview an adult about their efforts to achieve their dreams and aspirations.
Please see the Expressive Writing Rubric and Expressive Writing Checklist for this assignment.

Analytic essay prompt: What is the most important lesson modern-day readers should take from The Great Gatsby?
Please see the Formal Writing Rubric and Formal Writing Checklist for this assignment.

Exploring Poetry: Walt and Emiy






SAT Prep





The Crucible

Apparently, this site only works on Safari, not Firefox.
salem_witch_trials.jpg

Check out this video on McCarthyism:


A somewhat less engaging but historically accurate video on McCarthyism:




Crucible Assignments to be Created



Q4



Satirizing Successfully: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn


Daryl Cagle's Political Cartoons




Satire assignment: Write a satire of at least 300 words. It will be graded using the rubric below:




Examples of student satires:



Selling Yourself as a Student: the College Essay


Common Application Online

(Common Application)



Bringing Your Past to Life: The Things They Carried


The Things They Carried assignment: Write an autobiographical piece about your childhood at least 300 words long. You should be willing to share this piece with other students.
Please see the Expressive Writing Rubric and Expressive Writing Checklist for this assignment.



Emily Dickinson
Emily's Garden

A Rare Photo of Emily

"Some Keep the Sabbath Going to Church"

"'Hope' Is the Thing with Feathers"

"The Soul Selects Her Own Society"


Walt Whitman
Barbaric Yawp - Dead Poets Society

"A Supermarket in California"

Howl

Ginsberg Video and Audio

The Connection Between Ginsberg and Whitman

Song of Myself





Final Exam:




Some examples of reflections on writing: